Practicing Faith

Practicing Faith

From the archives of Oral RobertsSecond of two parts

Where you find fear, you can also find trouble lurking around — either real trouble or perceived trouble.

Many of our fears are based on false perceptions; when we don’t see the world the way it really is. We’re like the story about the person who looked out across the plains and saw an object on the horizon. Supposing it to be a wild animal, he prepared to run. As the object drew near, he saw that it was a man on a horse. Assuming that it was an enemy, he prepared to fight. As the man came nearer, he saw that it was not an enemy, but one of his own friends, so he prepared to welcome him. When the man came up close, he recognized his own brother and embraced him.

This story illustrates that fear can create many other emotions. It can cause us to see an enemy on every turn. A spirit of fear can give the mind a false perception, like objects looming up through a fog appear distorted and unclear. Many times things are not as terrifying as fear paints them to be. Even when situations may be connected to real troubles, our fear can magnify them. The “spirit of fear” is what the Bible describes as being from the devil. For God has not given us a spirit of fear, but of power and of love and of a sound mind (2 Timothy 1:7).

So what can we do when we seem to be suddenly overcome by a gripping spirit of fear? I believe we can put our faith, our “right-believing” into action. Romans 10:17 says, “Faith comes by hearing and hearing by the word of God.” I believe we can exercise our faith by reading the Word, hearing the Word, and putting the Word into action.